Contemporary African feel with Boere Baroque, Boet se Moet & Baked Beans on Toast

28 Feb

The Department of Foreign Affairs paint job brought to you by Boere Baroque, Boet se Moet and Baked Beans on Toast

The Department of Foreign Affairs

The Department of Foreign Affairs.

THE Presidential guest accommodation in Tshwane is part of the iconic 80 000m2 Department of Foreign Affairs complex. It was designed by TC Design Architects and incorporates office accommodation for the DFA head office, training and conference facilities, and two guest hotels for visiting international dignitaries.

The building has a uniquely African feel, inside and out. This has been achieved by using locally commissioned and custom made finishes and furnishings. An extensive specification demanded that coatings reflect the African context seamlessly within the contemporary design.

“Our best quality products, all made locally, were specified for the finishing”, says Jaco du Toit of Midas Earthcote, Waterkloof. “Midafelt 225, a high-quality acrylic, used in combination with aggregate primers, achieved a textured look that suited the desired earthy aesthetic, with the added benefit of being ultra durable.”

“The colour specification included ‘Boere Baroque’, ‘Boet Se Moet’ and ‘Baked Beans on Toast’, all of which add up to a strong South African story. The sparkly interior was created by Earthcote Tidalcote”, says du Toit.

This ultra-smooth trowelon plaster contains particles of twinkly marine material – creating a slightly iridescent feel. It is earthy, organic and African, but also very contemporary and sophisticated. Simon Fraser, Marketing Director for Midas Earthcote, adds:

“This was a prestigious project to be a part of and a great way of showcasing South African creativity and innovation to visiting dignitaries. Our products are designed and produced in South Africa, to withstand local climatic conditions. Our colours and textures have a distinctively African handwriting. These kinds of finishes would look impressive and contemporary on any modern building, anywhere in the world, but they feel particularly well placed in an African context.”

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